Intensive Delta Course Week 4

wpid-img_20141013_221425.jpgThis was the third week of Module 2. We had LSA 2 – our second assessed lessons and generally got pretty tired.

1. What was your lightbulb moment this week?

It’s not really lightbulby, more a slow dawning – the top-down and bottom-up processes idea fits with the ideas about how the brain works I read in The Master And His Emissary (truly awesome book about the brain and the history of western philosophy culture.) For ZATAOMM fans, you can tie it in with the Romantic and Analytical stuff too.

2. What was the most stressful thing?

Realising that I could have talked my lesson plan through with my tutor – after teaching the lesson! No harm done, though.

3. What do you wish you could have done?

See no. 2! 

4. What is the best activity you have learned this week?

Ways to teach the phonemic chart using actions and no sounds on the part of the teacher. The students copy the actions and make the sounds the actions suggest. The idea is that the sound is visual and physical as well as aural. 

5. Whats the best tip you have learned this week?

Don’t drill the schwa on its own! It’s weak!

6. What have you done to relax?

Not a lot, other than the coffee break, which is my favourite part of the day. And watch a terrible, mndless show I’m too embarrassed to admit I watch here. Some of us went out for dinner on Thursday night to celebrate being HALFWAY THROUGH THE COURSE!

7. 7. What is your new favourite word or phrase?

False cognate. I thought she said kitten. You had to be there. (Ahem.)

8. What book have you added to your wishlist?

Asiding from wanting to finish the novel I left behind in England (Life: A User’s Manual, by George Perec), and wanting to read The Master And His Emissary again, I’ve put Adrian Underhill’s Sound Foundations on the wishlist. [Aside: I’ve got stuck on the last few pages of that Julian Barnes book. Wasn’t as impressed as I’d hoped. Anyone else read it?]

10. Which area have you improved in this week?

Probably generally understanding listening skills better. I’ve got better at providing a written record too. I can do a mean handout, given 20.8 hours.

11. What resource (teaching, learning or other) would you like to share?

I take it back about Skitch. It’s crashed and lost my notes twice. Instead I give you http://www.photransedit.com/. You can translate normal text into phonemic text! My tutor recommended it for making short jokes in phonemic script to give to students to learn for homework. After learning the phonemic script, of course. They then come back the next lesson and tell each other the jokes.

12. What are you goals for the coming week? (Thank you for the new question, Sandy!)

To make sure my lesson for LSA3 is clearly planned out, and to start reading for the biggie, LSA 4. I’ve chosen to do lexis – collocations. Any advice most gratefully received.

wpid-img_20141013_221152.jpgLastly, I’d like to say that it’s about a year since my first blog post. Having never thought I would, I’ve really enjoyed blogging and it’s definitely helped me improve my lesson planning. Thank you to the 460-something people who subscribe to my blog and to everyone who’s given me encouraging comments! And the spambots!
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One comment

  1. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with drilling schwa on it’s own for a bit if it’s the first time they’ve been introduced to the concept, as it is a different sound and therefore mouth position from any of the others. I always get my students to completely relax their faces and imagine they are a bored teenager responding to a question they think is stupid. It’s true that when they are working on that sound especially they tend to stress it at the same time, but that’s like overuse of a new grammatical form like Past Perfect and soon passes or can be dealt with in a future class I reckon.

    Here’s my collocations page with a couple of articles and some worksheets on the topic:
    http://tefltastic.wordpress.com/worksheets/vocabulary/collocations/

    Also includes a review of the useful book Teaching Chunks of Language

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